Of Parrots and Eagles, Part Two

Eagle thinkers ask the hard questions, take strategic risks, search hard for the whole truth, and soar high above mediocrity. Parrot people enjoy the predictable, routine, rehearsed words of others. As we discussed yesterday, the church is overrun with parrots and virtually devoid of eagles. Too harsh? You decide.

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Balance, Part Two

Both adversity and prosperity confront our equilibrium, but prosperity is perhaps the more challenging test. Today we look at another biblical person who rose to the top and kept his balance. The classic example is David. According to the last three verses of Psalm 78: [God] also chose David His servant and took him from the sheepfolds; From the care of the ewes with suckling lambs He brought him to shepherd Jacob His people, and Israel His inheritance. So he shepherded them according to the integrity of his heart, and guided them with his skillful hands. (Psalm 78:70–72, emphasis added)

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It’s about Time, Part Two

Yesterday, I mentioned my penchant for time-management books. It’s a vital topic to address because it bleeds into every area of life. Let me mention a few specifics. Some people are always running late. Yes, always. Punctuality is simply a time-management matter. Some folks feverishly work right up to the deadline on every assignment or project they undertake.

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Cooperation

Great civilizations often achieve great things because they have a great leader who casts a vision, marshals their resources, organizes their members, inspires their action, and of course, goes before them. People generally fare better when they have a leader, when someone helps them cooperate and accomplish what can only be achieved with a coordinated effort. But what if there is no leader?

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Weaned from Pride

As is true of all of us on special occasions, David had learned a truth that was so exciting he had to share it. He wanted his entire nation to enter into this joyous experience with him. As Psalm 131 concludes, David expresses his desire for the nation he leads.

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Composed and Quiet

Having chosen to enter a season of quietness, stepping back from public view, David examines the effect of humility on his soul. Psalm 131 contains several curious word pictures. Verse 2: Was that capable and passionate man of war irritated and out of sorts because he had been reduced from captain of the team to spectator? Not in the least.

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Teachability

David’s song, preserved for us as Psalm 131, says that he does not involve himself in great matters or “things too difficult for him.” The idea here is that he doesn’t pursue places of prominence or greatness. He recognizes his own limitations based on an honest assessment of his knowledge and skills, and he feels no need to play the hero. He simply doesn’t have anything to prove.

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Genuine Humility

With a mere three verses, Psalm 131 is one of the shortest chapters in the Bible. If it is ever true, however, that good things come in small packages, this psalm is proof of that. Charles Haddon Spurgeon—the prince of preachers—said of this song of David: Comparing all the Psalms to gems, we should liken this to a pearl: how beautifully it will adorn the neck of patience.

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Response to Others

Psalm 101, David’s spiritual manifesto in song, began with a list of admirable qualities the king desired to cultivate. He then took a good look around him to determine how he would respond to different kinds of individuals based on their positive or negative influence. The Blameless. He who walks in a blameless way is the one who will minister to me. (101:6b)

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Staying On Course

Having identified four qualities to cultivate, David’s spiritual manifesto in Psalm 101 continues with several declarations, each intended to keep him on course in pursuit of his divine purpose. David no longer looks within, he looks around. He considers the people of his kingdom and declares his predetermined response to various types of individual.

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