Rejoice in God

David’s desert song, Psalm 63, contains a decision he hoped would enhance his relationship with the Lord: he decided to rejoice in God. But those who seek my life to destroy it, Will go into the depths of the earth. They will be delivered over to the power of the sword; They will be a prey for foxes. But the king will rejoice in God;

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Meditation and Singing

In his wilderness experience, David made five decisions that would deepen his connection with God. First, he decided to imagine the Lord’s physical presence. Then he decided to express praise for God out loud. His third decision is to devote himself to a mental discipline many in the twenty-first century do not clearly understand: meditation. He decided to meditate on the Lord (63:6).

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Satisfaction in Praise

David’s lonely wilderness sanctuary left him thirsty and hungry, not only for food, but for meaningful interaction with his God (Psalm 63:1–2). As his song continues, David describes a second decision he made to cultivate a relationship with the Lord: he decided to express praise to the Lord (63:3–5). Because Your lovingkindness is better than life, My lips will praise You.

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Seeking God’s Help

While David’s first response to fear wasn’t a panicked plea for help, he didn’t live in denial. He merely chose to celebrate God’s power and to recall His past triumphs. Eventually, however, David did ask the Lord for what he needed. No longer panicked, he expressed his desires with intense emotion.

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Fellowship with God

If you read Psalm 15 carefully, you will discover the entire song all hangs upon the first verse. Verse 1 is crucial in that it asks a probing question. That’s today’s devotional. David’s answer forms the rest of the psalm. He then arrives at a wonderful promise. These we’ll look at over the next couple of days.

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Looking to God

As I read Psalm 13 and reflect on the section describing David on his face, overwhelmed with grief and hopelessness, I see two practical areas of application: 1. It was the length of the test that began to weary David. “How long” occurs four times in two brief verses. Let us remember that God not only designs the depth of our trials but also their length.

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How to Seek Wisdom

If you genuinely desire God’s wisdom, rest assured He has promised not to withhold it. He declares, “I love those who love me; and those who diligently seek me will find me” (Proverbs 8:17). Here are two additional disciplines that will put you in touch with God’s insight, knowledge, and understanding. 3. The discipline of prevailing prayer. “Cry for discernment, lift your voice for understanding” (v. 3).

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Agents of God’s Will

Having reviewed the attributes of God, focusing on His sovereignty and goodness, David examines himself (Psalm 5:7–8). But as for me, by Your abundant lovingkindness I will enter Your house, at Your holy temple I will bow in reverence for You. O LORD, lead me in Your righteousness because of my foes; make Your way straight before me.

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The Psalmist’s Plea

Some psalms are difficult to outline; others easily lend themselves to an organized layout. Psalm 5 falls in the latter category. It begins with a plea (Psalm 5:1–3) directed to the Lord, whom David addresses, “O LORD . . . my King . . . my God . . . O LORD.” It concludes with a promise (5:12). Sandwiched between the plea and the promise are four descriptions.

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The Lord Is Near

I called on Your name, O LORD, out of the lowest pit. You have heard my voice, “Do not hide Your ear from my prayer for relief, from my cry for help.” You drew near when I called on You; You said, “Do not fear!” (Lamentations 3:55–57) Our Father, we find relief in knowing that You’re here. We talk to You as though You are sitting right next to us. For indeed, though we cannot see You, by faith we believe You’re here.

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