Fallibility, Part Two

God’s Word is infallible; people are not. Yesterday, we noted that this point is particularly underscored in the realm of leadership. We naturally seek after ministers we can respect and follow. And then—glory!—we come across some whose lives are admirable, whose leadership seems to be blessed of God, and whose instruction is biblical, wise, and dynamic.

Read More

Weaned from Pride

As is true of all of us on special occasions, David had learned a truth that was so exciting he had to share it. He wanted his entire nation to enter into this joyous experience with him. As Psalm 131 concludes, David expresses his desire for the nation he leads.

Read More

Composed and Quiet

Having chosen to enter a season of quietness, stepping back from public view, David examines the effect of humility on his soul. Psalm 131 contains several curious word pictures. Verse 2: Was that capable and passionate man of war irritated and out of sorts because he had been reduced from captain of the team to spectator? Not in the least.

Read More

Teachability

David’s song, preserved for us as Psalm 131, says that he does not involve himself in great matters or “things too difficult for him.” The idea here is that he doesn’t pursue places of prominence or greatness. He recognizes his own limitations based on an honest assessment of his knowledge and skills, and he feels no need to play the hero. He simply doesn’t have anything to prove.

Read More

A Proud or Humble Heart

In a matter-of-fact fashion, David addresses the Lord in Psalm 131. Throughout the song, he carries on a conversation with his God. While humility is the subject, the focus is himself. Eight times in the first two verses he uses “I,” “me,” and “my.” The poem is a brief glimpse into David’s personal journal.

Read More

A Lack of Knowledge

Sometimes the grind of low enthusiasm results from not having sufficient knowledge to address life’s difficulties. While additional training in management or finances or parenting or vocational skills can certainly help, all knowledge must be built upon a foundation of spiritual wisdom. In verses 98–100 of Psalm 119, the composer speaks of the superiority of the Word over three sources of truth held in high esteem by the world.

Read More

Honor and Integrity

I once heard the president of a seminary express his concern over the school by saying, “I fear we may be turning out graduates with a great number of beliefs but not enough conviction.” Conviction gives beliefs a backbone. David wasn’t satisfied with a set of theological truths floating around in his head; he pinned them down to concrete convictions.

Read More

Wisdom, Understanding, and Knowledge

Solomon and the wise men of Israel regarded wisdom, understanding, and knowledge as worthy pursuits in life. In fact, given the choice between wisdom and material wealth, they opted for wisdom, hands down. For them, clear thinking held the key to success in all areas of life. How much better it is to get wisdom than gold! And to get understanding is to be chosen above silver. (16:16)

Read More

Unbalanced

The longer I live, the more I realize how easily a routine can become a rut and how quickly priorities can become obsessions. Last week we examined the grind of laziness and discovered ways to avoid becoming a sluggard. But the decision to make work a priority and be diligent in our responsibilities can carry us to extremes: our industriousness can become workaholism.

Read More

Consider the Source

Imagine David wilting under a bush or slumped in a cave, pouring out his feelings in Psalm 54, begging the Lord for help. The first three verses are a prayer with emphasis on the enemy. The spotlight then turns to the composer’s divine defender as the next two verses form a picture. The last two verses are words of praise as David focuses on his own history with God.

Read More